Biotechnology HPC Software Applications Institute (BHSAI)

BHSAI Crosses the Pond for the Annual Blast Injury Conference

September 30, 2019   |  Download PDF

The 2019 Blast Injury Conference, held from 11 – 12 July at the Imperial College of London welcomed 220 delegates from ten countries, as well as His Royal Highness Prince Harry the Duke of Sussex. The conference was hosted by the Imperial’s Centre for Blast Injury Studies.

Dr. Reifman presented ‘Effects of animal orientation on brain responses to primary blast’ & ‘Potential cause of primary, blast-induced brain injury: direct vs. indirect mechanisms’ at the 2019 Blast Injury Conference. (Photo credit: www.blastinjury.org.uk)Dr. Reifman presented ‘Effects of animal orientation on brain responses to primary blast’ & ‘Potential cause of primary, blast-induced brain injury: direct vs. indirect mechanisms’ at the 2019 Blast Injury Conference. (Photo credit: www.blastinjury.org.uk)


The 2019 Blast Injury Conference included an invigorating multidisciplinary program of presentations that delved into a broad range of topics related to military and civilian blast injury. The intention of the conference was to provide a stimulating environment where international and UK Researchers, Clinicians and Specialists from across the research pipeline could showcase their discoveries, reinforce existing but also spark new collaborations, and share knowledge and awareness in topics associated with blast injury.

Dr. Jaques Reifman, Director of TATRC’s Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute (BHSAI), was among the top researchers invited to share his work in the field and presented two abstracts on primary (non-contact), blast-induced brain injury in rats.

The first presentation was on the ‘Effects of animal orientation on brain responses to primary blast.’ For this important project, BHSAI scientists, together with collaborators at the U.S. Army’s Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), showed that the same blast wave affected the intracranial brain pressure in peripheral regions and maximum principal strains throughout the brain differently depending on whether the rat was positioned prone or vertically relative to the blast wave.

Dr. Reifman’s second presentation at the Conference dealt with the ‘Potential cause of primary, blast-induced brain injury: direct vs. indirect mechanisms.’ In collaboration with scientists at WRAIR and the New Jersey Institute of Technology BHSAI researchers characterized the changes in the rat brain due to direct and indirect mechanisms of primary blast-induced injury at a blast overpressure of 130 kPa, and found that the direct mechanism was the major contributor to brain changes due to blast exposure.

Professor Anthony Bull, Director of the Centre and Head of the Department of Bioengineering, stated, “The Centre focuses on improving treatments and recovery through medicine, prosthetics and rehabilitation, and develops better ways of protecting those serving in current and future conflicts. The research discussed at this year’s Blast Injury Conference is a shining example of how bringing together scientists, engineers, medical professionals and military personnel for preventing and treating blast injuries can really change lives.”


This article was published in the March 2020 issue of the TATRC Times.


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